People think that being a good multi-tasker, something research says is impossible, means you are able to manage multiple projects. Most employees need to be able to manage different projects at the same time, meeting deadlines and working with others, to be effective.

Among the many topics Cohosts Dr. Tobin Porterfield and Bob Graham cover in this important episode on an often-overlooked soft skill are:

  • Differences between multi-tasking and managing multiple projects
  • Why we seem to believe multi-tasking works
  • Technology’s role in this soft skill
  • Are we using our time more effectively?
  • How to get ahead of multiple projects
  • What to do when things are not being well managed
  • Why looking at the Big Picture too much hurts being able to manage multiple projects.
  • A real example of managing a project to ensure it can be managed with other projects
  • How computers switch better than humans
  • Blocking out your day to ensure projects are managed well
  • More tips for ensuring you can juggle multiple projects
  • The other soft skills incorporated into managing multiple projects
  • Addressing the fact that things may go wrong once in a while

Next week

We will be looking at the role of storytelling. While not a soft skill, storytelling plays a huge role in being effective in a job search and in being successful in work situations.

Being responsive is a soft skill that can spark creativity, trust and innovation in teams big and small. Learn how and why in this week’s episode of Serious Soft Skills.

Cohosts Dr. Tobin Porterfield and Bob Graham explain how the soft skill of being responsive sets teams up to succeed.

Among the topics they discuss in this episode:

  • Being responsive from a supply chain perspective
  • How the best responses are complete, accurate and timely answers
  • Realistic responses and how they improve our work experience
  • When emails actually hurt, not help, responsiveness
  • How being unresponsive can hurt teams and careers
  • Why being responsive is a core issue for any successful employee
  • Getting back quickly isn’t enough. It’s the value of the response.
  • Phone calls and face-to-face meetings accelerate responsiveness

Next week

We will dig into another of the 55 soft skills or how to apply one of them to help you in your career.

The decision on when to escalate a situation to a boss or supervisor is an important one, for which rules are rarely clear.  In today’s episode, cohosts Dr. Tobin Porterfield and Bob Graham are going to explain this soft skill and how and when we should be escalating a situation to a higher-up, and why successfully using this soft skill can help an organization’s culture and trust.

Porterfield and Graham explore the idea of escalating situations from the manager and employee perspective and how this soft skill really comes down to determining the right people to provide the right information to at the right time.

Among the topics they discuss are:

  • Fierce Conversations by Susan Scott, and its application to escalating a situation
  • Two sides of the coin: one where the situation does not escalate and the other where escalation occurs
  • Our natural desire to avoid problems
  • Why managers need to know about problems early
  • The nuance of determining when to escalate a situation and when to handle things on their own
  • Determining when escalation should occur: immediately or at the next update
  • Why creating a list of when to escalate can never work
  • How the unique nature of each organization makes it impossible to determine exactly when to escalate
  • Where accepting criticism, another soft skill, fits into being able to escalate
  • Helping a boss to avoid problems later
  • A powerful example of when not escalating hurt a leader
  • When the ability to escalate helps build a stronger organizational culture with transparency
  • The responsibility that everyone in an organization has to ensure proper escalation
  • How escalation when properly handled creates confidence in an organization and builds trust

Next week

We will explore another soft skill, being responsive, in an episode to be released next Wednesday.

Our latest Serious Soft Skills Podcast looks at how paying attention to details can help an individual, the team and the organization. But unfortunately, most of us struggle with this important soft skill. Learn why it matters and how to do it better in this episode of Serious Soft Skills.


Cohosts Dr. Tobin Porterfield and Bob Graham explore the many important benefits of paying attention to details.

Among the topics they cover:

  • Who benefits from our attention to detail
  • What happens when we don’t pay attention to details
  • How to pay attention to details more effectively
  • Eight hints for better paying attention to details

Next week

The Serious Soft Skills Podcast will explain how complying with standards makes the soft skills list.

Co-hosts Dr. Tobin Porterfield and Bob Graham talk about setting goals and prioritizing, which together make an important soft skills for managers, leaders and any employee.

Setting goals, as in organizing and prioritizing your work, is critical for team success. To make sure everyone is working toward the same overall goal, we need to assign tasks. Those tasks have to be completed on time or else others will be waiting.

Among the topics they address:

  • Examples of where setting goals and prioritizing are critical to achieving results.
  • How most of us have deadlines each day, week or month.
  • Why these goals have to be in sync
  • Tips for setting goals
  • Being SMART

We can set our own priorities in a day, evaluating what needs to be done, what others might need from us, what we need from others. The best employees are updating their priorities as situations change throughout the day. They don’t write a list in pen, but rather in pencil, with an eraser.

Good leaders and managers set realistic priorities and goals for their staff, ideally with their consent and buy-in. Rather than telling people what to do, they work with people to align personal and organizational goals to be the same. This shared vision can be powerful, especially when things go wrong. And they will.

No matter how much we prioritize, things go wrong. How we deal with it — by readjusting — can make or break us and our organizations.

Enthusiasm is not just a soft skills; it’s an attitude, a choice we make that is often heavily influenced by our workplace culture, but more importantly, success. We’ll discuss how and why enthusiasm is important in every workplace.

Co-hosts Dr. Tobin Porterfield and Bob Graham discuss the following:

  • The value of enthusiasm and why it’s a soft skill
  • The Fake It Till You Make It reality
  • Enthusiasm is a form of professionalism
  • How optimism fuels enthusiasm
  • Tips for how to look enthusiastic, even when you aren’t
  • Why enthusiasm is infectious and how the opposite is cancerous
  • How team members can help a person who lacks enthusiasm
  • Winston Churchill’s view of enthusiasm and its effect on success
  • Why managers and leaders have to bring the enthusiasm
  • Where journaling and daily reflection can help you retain the enthusiasm
  • Making sure failures don;’t pile up
  • Portraying things to encourage enthusiasm
  • Avoiding manufactured enthusiasm

Next week

We will answer more questions from our listeners on soft skills in their workplace.

Written communication is an important skill, for it is often our first — and potentially — lasting impression of a person. We’ll discuss good writing and give tips for how to write better.

 

Hosts Dr. Tobin Porterfield and Bob Graham talk about the important soft skill of written communication in this episode. Among the topics they cover are:

  • How our writing is often where people first encounter us
  • Why writing conveys what’s inside our minds
  • Writing tells us about how someone sees the world, sees his or her role in the world and what he wants to accomplish.
  • Understanding audience and its role in writing well
  • How writing in our own language may not be the best way to write
  • The writer’s role as a “reader’s advocate” and taking the reader’s perspective on your writing
  • Putting actions steps early in writing
  • Good writing encourages reader action
  • How writers inadvertently discourage their readers
  • Why the pile of emails to get to exists and why it’s the email writer’s fault
  • The 3-sentence and 4-sentence email pledge
  • How getting away from typewriters has spawned worse writing
  • The deadly action of Reply All and what it says to your reader
  • Respecting and using your awareness of your audience to improve your writing
  • No matter where you are in your writing life, a list of easy ways to dramatically improve your writing today
  • The value of spell checkers and grammar checkers
  • Why big words might not be your writing friend
  • Why great words should not be overused
  • How verbs really do drive sentences
  • Self-editing and outside editing help
  • An easy, fun way to edit your writing
  • The financial equivalent of wasted words in your writing
  • Tips for helping readers find key information
  • Making your writing “sticky”
  • How subject lines and file names can help the recipient of your communication
  • The number one worst thing to do with email

Next Week

We’ll be looking at another soft skill on our list of 55 soft skills. Email us at podcast

Some see the soft skill of collaboration as a valuable soft skill, while others say it stunts creativity. The hosts give their views on these divergent points of view.

 

osts Dr. Tobin Porterfield and Bob Graham explore the various views regarding the soft skill of collaboration as a followup to their discussion in Episode 22 of what collaboration is.

Topics discussed include:

  • Does collaboration kill creativity, as Geoffrey James suggests in an Inc. magazine article, Collaboration Kills Creativity, According to Science?
  • Do teams add or distract from collaboration?
  • Taking academic research to real-world situations
  • How collaboration empowers us to solve problems in this complex business world
  • Can collaboration fall into “group think”?
  • Does collaboration fuel our need for socialization?
  • What problems are better solved as individuals
  • How collaboration creates holistic and effective solutions to complex problems
  • What’s the line between a situation needing collaboration and individual creativity
  • When does collaboration fit into problem-solving
  • When creative processes should call in collaboration
  • Headline writing and collaboration
  • The cost benefit evaluation of collaboration
  • Exploring Morten T. Hansen’s views in the article, When Internal Collaboration Is Bad for Your Company
  • When the cost benefit should be evaluated and what the assessment can accomplish
  • When to quit a project

Next Week

We’ll look at another soft skill, written communication, and how it plays a critical role in relationships and effectiveness.

Collaboration among workers can be the jet fuel for teams, pushing them to solve problems and achieve results that they could not have accomplished separately.

 

Hosts Dr. Tobin Porterfield and Bob Graham discuss what collaboration is, why it is so beneficial to organizations and what it can deliver to teams and organizations.

Topics discussed include:

  • What collaboration is
  • How people’s perspectives have to align for collaboration to occur
  • Why collaboration gets us to a better spot
  • How collaboration stokes problem-solving
  • The distinction between collaboration for creative endeavors versus collaboration in getting products developed
  • Why collaboration is vital to supply chains and other services
  • What’s a “rallying point” and why do we need it to have successful collaboration
  • A “reel” example of collaboration
  • What underlies any effective collaboration
  • The soft skills that underpin all good collaboration
  • What mutual interdependence is and why it enables good collaboration
  • The best ways for collaboration to start
  • The role of the leader in facilitating collaboration
  • How passion can ignite collaboration

Next Week

Digging deeper into collaboration in the workplace.

Being persuasive is a foundational soft skill that everyone in an organization has a responsibility to use, although it’s vitally important to being a successful leader.

 

 

Dr. Tobin Porterfield and Bob Graham discuss the soft skill of being persuasive and how it use can spur an organization’s growth.

Among the topics they discuss are:

  • Why being persuasive makes our list
  • How to differentiate between manipulation and persuasion
  • A working definition of persuasion
  • How persuasion leads to “buy-in”
  • How persuasion is about attraction
  • Identifying what makes a proposal fit the goals of an organization and how being persuasive fits in
  • When to set aside an idea because the buy-in is missing
  • Knowing when to move things forward
  • When persuasion becomes office politics and how to avoid it
  • Examples of persuasive arguments
  • How to ask for a raise using persuasion
  • Tips for what any
  • persuasion ultimately needs to include
  • When persuasion can run amok
  • When persuasion reaches coalescence
  • How understanding your audience is critical to any effective persuasion
  • Where an organization’s history plays into persuasion

Next week

We will explore a listener’s timely suggestion for another soft skill to add to our list of 55 soft skills.